Work Principles

To achieve its goals, our Foundation acts in accordance with the following principles:

THE PRINCIPLE OF RESPONSIBILITY

The Foundation has a legal, as well as ethical and moral, responsibility for the contents and results of its activities. When establishing goals and determining how to achieve them, we focus on systematic analysis of previous experience, as well as the latest developments in science and the practice of charitable assistance. The Foundation is constantly assessing the suitability of its fund usage and any risks involved, and takes appropriate preventive measures both through external and internal inspection.

The Foundation’s responsibility is three-fold:
• Responsibility towards the main beneficiaries (children): to respect their rights, and to act in their best interests;
• Responsibility towards the principal partner of the Foundation – the RCCH : to fulfill joint tasks;
• Responsibility towards the donors and sponsors: financial efficiency and transparency.

THE PRINCIPLE OF COMBINING PROFESSIONALISM WITH MINISTRATION

The Foundation’s personnel and voluntary aid regard their activities as, on the one hand, a fully-fledged profession that requires relevant training, competence and continued self-education, and, on the other , as a form of ministration which provides an opportunity to apply in practice the principles of benevolence, compassion, helping neighbors, and social participation.

The Foundation believes that the combination of a professional approach and the philosophy of ministration is the most effective way to organize charity activities.

ETHICAL PRINCIPLES

These principles regulate primarily the process of charity fundraising and ensure the supremacy of ethical rules over  fundraising technologies.

When providing assistance, we believe it inadmissible to:

  • Give preference to any particular children on the basis of faith, nationality, age, personal attitudes of the Foundation’s personnel, or any other characteristics that distinguish a particular child from the  rest of the hospital’s patients;
  • Unwarranted  use of medical and personal details, total disclosure of personal data in publications concerning the child;
  • Conscious attempts to raise an amount of money greater than is needed to implement a program, project or campaign.
 

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